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Solution Manual for Financial and Managerial Accounting 8th Edition By Wild

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Solution Manual for Financial and Managerial Accounting 8th Edition By Wild

Chapter 1

Accounting in Business

QUESTION

  1. The purpose of accounting is to provide decision makers with relevant and reliable information to help them make better decisions. Examples include information for people making investments, loans, and business plans.
  2. Technology reduces the time, effort, and cost of recordkeeping. There is still a demand for people who can design accounting systems, supervise their operation, analyze complex transactions, and interpret reports. Demand also exists for people who can effectively use computers to prepare and analyze accounting reports. Technology will never substitute for qualified people with abilities to prepare, use, analyze, and interpret accounting information.
  3. External users and their uses of accounting information include: (a) lenders, to measure the risk and return of loans; (b) shareholders, to assess whether to buy, sell, or hold their shares; (c) directors, to oversee the organization; (d) employees and labor unions, to judge the fairness of wages and assess future employment opportunities; and (e) regulators, to determine whether the organization is complying with regulations. Other users are voters, legislators, governmentofficials, contributors to nonprofits, suppliers, and customers.
  4. Business owners and managers use accounting information to help answer questions such as: What resources does an organization own? What debts are owed? How much income is earned? Are expenses reasonable for the level of sales? Are customers’ accounts being promptly collected?
  5. Service businesses include: Standard and Poor’s, Dun & Bradstreet, Merrill Lynch, Southwest Airlines, CitiCorp, Humana, Charles Schwab, and Prudential.  Businesses offering products include Nike, Reebok, Gap, Apple, Ford Motor Co., Philip Morris, Coca-Cola, Best Buy, and WalMart.
  6. The internal role of accounting is to serve the organization’s internal operating functions. It does this by providing useful information for internal users in completing their tasks more effectively and efficiently. By providing this information, accounting helps the organization reach its overall goals.
  7. Accounting professionals offer many services including auditing, management advice, tax planning, business valuation, and money management.
  8. Marketing managers are likely interested in information such as sales volume, advertising costs, promotion costs, salaries of sales personnel, and sales commissions.
  9. Accounting is described as a service activity because it serves decision makers by providing information to help them make better business decisions.
  10. Some accounting-related professions include consultant, financial analyst, underwriter, financial planner, appraiser, FBI investigator, market researcher, and system designer.

QUICK STUDIES

Quick Study 1-1 (10 minutes)

1. f    Technology
2. c    Recording
3. h    Recordkeeping (bookkeeping)

 

Quick Study 1-2 (10 minutes)

a. E   External user g. E    External user
b. E   External user h. E    External user
c. E   External user i. I     Internal user
d. E   External user j. E    External user
e. I     Internal user k. E    External user
f. E   External user l. E    External user

 

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DescriptionBy: Wild Edition: 8th Edition Format: Downloadable ZIP Fille Resource Type: Solution Manual Duration: Unlimited downloads Delivery: Instant DownloadEdition: 6th Edition Format: Downloadable ZIP Fille Resource Type: Solution manual Duration: Unlimited downloads Delivery: Instant DownloadEdition: 7th Edition Format: Downloadable ZIP Fille Resource Type: Solution manual Duration: Unlimited downloads Delivery: Instant DownloadEdition: 3rd Edition Format: Downloadable ZIP Fille Resource Type: Solution manual Duration: Unlimited downloads Delivery: Instant DownloadBy: Mintz Edition: 5th Edition Format: Downloadable ZIP Fille Resource Type: Solution Manual Duration: Unlimited downloads Delivery: Instant DownloadEdition: 11th Edition Format: Downloadable ZIP Fille Resource Type: Solution manual Duration: Unlimited downloads Delivery: Instant Download
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Solution Manual for Financial and Managerial Accounting 8th Edition By Wild

Chapter 1

Accounting in Business QUESTION
  1. The purpose of accounting is to provide decision makers with relevant and reliable information to help them make better decisions. Examples include information for people making investments, loans, and business plans.
  2. Technology reduces the time, effort, and cost of recordkeeping. There is still a demand for people who can design accounting systems, supervise their operation, analyze complex transactions, and interpret reports. Demand also exists for people who can effectively use computers to prepare and analyze accounting reports. Technology will never substitute for qualified people with abilities to prepare, use, analyze, and interpret accounting information.
  3. External users and their uses of accounting information include: (a) lenders, to measure the risk and return of loans; (b) shareholders, to assess whether to buy, sell, or hold their shares; (c) directors, to oversee the organization; (d) employees and labor unions, to judge the fairness of wages and assess future employment opportunities; and (e) regulators, to determine whether the organization is complying with regulations. Other users are voters, legislators, governmentofficials, contributors to nonprofits, suppliers, and customers.
  4. Business owners and managers use accounting information to help answer questions such as: What resources does an organization own? What debts are owed? How much income is earned? Are expenses reasonable for the level of sales? Are customers’ accounts being promptly collected?
  5. Service businesses include: Standard and Poor’s, Dun & Bradstreet, Merrill Lynch, Southwest Airlines, CitiCorp, Humana, Charles Schwab, and Prudential.  Businesses offering products include Nike, Reebok, Gap, Apple, Ford Motor Co., Philip Morris, Coca-Cola, Best Buy, and WalMart.
  6. The internal role of accounting is to serve the organization’s internal operating functions. It does this by providing useful information for internal users in completing their tasks more effectively and efficiently. By providing this information, accounting helps the organization reach its overall goals.
  7. Accounting professionals offer many services including auditing, management advice, tax planning, business valuation, and money management.
  8. Marketing managers are likely interested in information such as sales volume, advertising costs, promotion costs, salaries of sales personnel, and sales commissions.
  9. Accounting is described as a service activity because it serves decision makers by providing information to help them make better business decisions.
  10. Some accounting-related professions include consultant, financial analyst, underwriter, financial planner, appraiser, FBI investigator, market researcher, and system designer.
QUICK STUDIES Quick Study 1-1 (10 minutes)
1. f    Technology
2. c    Recording
3. h    Recordkeeping (bookkeeping)
  Quick Study 1-2 (10 minutes)
a. E   External user g. E    External user
b. E   External user h. E    External user
c. E   External user i. I     Internal user
d. E   External user j. E    External user
e. I     Internal user k. E    External user
f. E   External user l. E    External user
 

Solution Manual for Fundamentals of Cost Accounting 6th Edition by Lanen

Chapter 1 Cost Accounting: Information for DecisionMaking     Learning Objectives  
  1. Describe the way managers use accounting information to create value in organizations.
 
  1. Distinguish between the uses and users of cost accounting and financial accounting information.
 
  1. Explain how cost accounting information is used for decision making and performance evaluation in organizations.
 
  1. Identify current trends in cost accounting.
 
  1. Understand ethical issues faced by accountants and ways to deal with ethical problems that you face in your career.
    Chapter Overview  
  1. VALUE CREATION IN ORGANIZATIONS
  • Why Start with Value Creation?
  • Value Chain
  • Supply Chain and Distribution Chain
  • Using Cost Information to Increase Value
  • Accounting and the Value Chain
 
  1. ACCOUNTING SYSTEMS
  • Financial Accounting
  • Cost Accounting
  • Cost Accounting, GAAP, and IFRS
  • Customers of Cost Accounting
  III.       OUR FRAMEWORK FOR ASSESSING COST ACCOUNTING SYSTEMS
  • The Manager’s Job Is to Make Decisions
  • Decision Making Requires Information
  • Finding and Eliminating Activities That Don’t Add Value
  • Identifying Strategic Opportunities Using Cost Analysis
  • Owners Use Cost Information to Evaluate Managers
 
  1. COST DATA FOR MANAGERIAL DECISIONS
  • Costs for Decision Making
  • Costs for Control and Evaluation
    • Budgeting
  • Different Data for Different Decisions
 
  1. TRENDS IN COST ACCOUNTINGthroughout the value chain
  • Cost Accounting in Research and Development (R&D)
  • Cost Accounting in Design
  • Cost Accounting in Purchasing
  • Cost Accounting in Production
  • Cost Accounting in Marketing
  • Cost Accounting in Distribution
  • Cost Accounting in Customer Service
  • Enterprise Resource Planning
  • Creating Value in the Organization
 
  1. KEY FINANCIAL PLAYERS IN THE ORGANIZATION
      Chapter Overview, continued   VII.     CHOICES: ETHICAL ISSUES FOR ACCOUNTANTS
  • What Makes Ethics So Important?
  • Ethics
  • The Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 and Ethics
  VIII.    COST ACCOUNTING AND OTHER BUSINESS DISCIPLINES  
  1. APPENDIX: INSTITUTE OF MANAGEMENT ACCOUNTANTS CODE OF ETHICS
  • Statements of Ethical Professional Practice
  • Principles
  • Standards
    • Resolving Ethical Issues
  Chapter Outline   LO 1-1   Describe the way managers use accounting information to create value in organizations.   VALUE CREATION IN ORGANIZATIONS  
  • Why Start with Value Creation?
 
  • Goal of cost accounting is to assist manages in achieving the maximum value for their organizations.
 
  • Value Chain
 
  • The value chain is the set of activities that transforms raw resources into the goods and services end users purchase and consume.
 
  • It includes the treatment or disposal of any waste generated by the end users.
 
  • Value-added activities are those that customers perceive as adding utility to the goods or services they purchase.
 
  • Exhibit 1.1 identifies the individual components of the value chain and providesexamples of the activities in each component, along with some of the costs associatedwith these activities.Although the list of value chain components suggests a sequential process, many of the components overlap.
 
  • Research and development (R&D): The creation and development of ideas related to new products, services, or processes.
 
  • Design: The detailed development and engineering of products, services, or processes.
 
  • Purchasing: The acquisition of goods and services needed to produce a good or service.
 
  • Production: The collection and assembly of resources to produce a product or deliver a service.
 
  • Marketing and Sales: The process of informing potential customers about the attributes of products or services that leads to their sale.
 
  • Distribution: The process for delivering products or services to customers.
 
  • Customer service: The support activities provided to customers for a product or service.
  • Before product ideas are formulated,no value exists. Once an idea is established, however, value is created.
 
  • Whenresearch and development of the product begins, value increases.
 
  • As the productreaches the design phase, value continues to increase.
 
  • Each component adds value tothe product or service.
 
  • Administrative functions, such as human resource management and accounting, are not included as part of the value chain; they are included instead in every business function of the value chain.
 
  • Supply Chain and Distribution Chain
 
  • The supply chainincludes the set of firms and individualsthat sells goods and servicesto the firm. (See Business Application box “Choosing Where to Produce in the Supply Chain.”)
 
  • The distribution chainincludes the set of firms and individualsthat buys and distributesgoods and services fromthe firm.
 
  • These suppliers and customers are on the firm’s boundaries. Thus, the supply chain and distribution chain are the parts of the value chain outside the firm.
 
  • Using Cost Information to Increase Value
 
  • The measurement and reporting of costs is avaluable activity.
 
  • Cost information that is received too late to help managersmakedecisionswould not add value.
 
  • Accounting and the Value Chain
 
  • Cost accounting focuses on how the individual stages contribute to the value and how to work with other managers to improve performance.

Solution Manual for Managerial Accounting 7th Edition by Wild

The solutions manual holds the correct answers to all questions within your textbook, therefore, It could save you time and effort. Also, they will improve your performance and grades. Most noteworthy, we do not restrict access to educators and teachers, as a result, students are allowed to get those manuals.
  • Noteworthy, both students and instructors can obtain this Solutions Manual.
  • FREE sample available for download.
  • Complete Solutions Manual guranteed. All Chapters included.
  • This is a digital downloadable product, therefore, no shipping address required.
  • Instant delivery. Also, file format comversion available upon request.
  • This is not the textbook, likewise, it is a supplementary manual for the textbook.
 
Title
Financial and Managerial Accounting
Edition
7th Edition
Authors
Wild, Shaw, Chiappetta
Resource
Solutions Manual
Publisher
McGraw Hill Education
ISBN
ISBN1259726703
SKU
C1259726703SM

Other Expressions for Solutions Manual

Solutions manual could be also called answer book, key answers, answer keys, textbook solutions and also textbook answers manual.
  • WILD FINANCIAL AND MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING 7/E SOLUTIONS MANUAL.
  • FINANCIAL AND MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING SOLUTIONS MANUAL PDF.

Solution Manual for Intermediate Accounting 3rd Edition by Wahlen

Description Solution Manual for Intermediate Accounting As a student, completing homework assignments can be challenging. Sometimes you forget the material that you previously learned in class. Other times, the subject matter is very complex and leaves you feeling confused. On the other hand, maybe you have a very busy schedule and frequently miss the deadline to hand in your homework.nnDo any (or all) of these scenarios sound familiar?nnYou are not alone. We understand life as a student is difficult. We believe homework should be a tool that helps you achieve excellent results in the classroom, so you can graduate with the highest GPA and go on to get the job of your dreams. It is for this very reason that we place at your disposal the Solution Manual for Intermediate Accounting 3rd Edition by Wahlen.nAre you ready to say goodbye to homework-induced frustration? nnSolution Manual Benefits:n • Instantly download the solution manual after purchasenn • View the free sample first, so you know exactly what you are gettingnn • Digital format provides access anywhere you have a computer or smartphonenn • Turn in your homework on time, every time (even if it’s due in a few hours!)nn • Figure out problems on your own and spend less time in extra help sessionsnn • Review your answers immediately after completing your homeworknn • Check your reasoning and understanding of each problem as you gonnThe solution manual contain solutions and answers to the exercises, review questions, problems and case studies directly from your textbook. Whenever you dont know how to solve a problem, it can be helpful to look up the answer in the solutions manual, and then work backwards to figure it out.n nIt gets even BETTER:nnThe solutions manual is in digital downloadable format and can be accessed instantly after purchase! All it takes is the click of a button and you will be on your way to understanding your homework and completing it faster than ever before. Buy the solutions manual and become a homework master today! You will soon wonder how you ever survived without it.

Solution Manual for Ethical Obligations and Decision-Making in Accounting 5th Edition By Mintz

Chapter 1 -- Discussion Questions Suggested Discussion and Solutions
  1. A common ethical dilemma used to distinguish between philosophical reasoning methods is the following. Imagine that you are standing on a footbridge spanning some trolley tracks. You see that a runaway trolley is threatening to kill five people. Standing next to you, in between the oncoming trolley and the five people, is a railway worker wearing a large backpack. You quickly realize that the only way to save the people is to push the man off the bridge and onto the tracks below. The man will die, but the bulk of his body and the pack will stop the trolley from reaching the others. (You quickly understand that you can’t jump yourself because you aren’t large enough to stop the trolley, and there’s no time to put on the man’s backpack.) Legal concerns aside, would it be ethical for you to save the five people by pushing this stranger to his death? Use the deontological and teleological methods to reason out what you would do and why.
Is it Ethical to Save Five People at the Expense of One? Lessons from the Talmud The Trolley Problem is a thought experiment in ethics, first introduced by Philippa Foot in 1967. Others have also extensively analyzed the problem including Judith Jarvis Thomason, Peter Unger, and Frances Kamm as recently as 1996.  The authors used these problems in ethics class to challenge students’ moral intuition. The choice is between saving five lives at the cost of taking one life. Before we get to the “answers,” we want to explain how one researcher is using MRI technology to map brain responses while analyzing the dilemma. Joshua Greene at Harvard University was more concerned to understand why we have the intuitions, so he used functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging, or fMRI, to examine what happens in people’s brains when they make these moral judgments. Greene found that people asked to make a moral judgment about “personal” violations, like pushing the stranger off the footbridge, showed increased activity in areas of the brain associated with the emotions. This was not the case with people asked to make judgments about relatively “impersonal” violations like throwing a switch. Moreover, the minority of subjects who did consider that it would be right to push the stranger off the footbridge took longer to reach this judgment than those who said that doing so would be wrong. Interesting results to say the least. Many do not believe it to be ethical to intentionally end someone else's life whether it is to save others or not.  Most do not believe it is a moral responsibility to sacrifice one life in order that others may go on.  If you push someone in the way to save others, you may as well say you killed a man.  How could you forgive yourself? The man has a family and people who love him, so how could you explain your actions to his family? We have no right to sacrifice the life of one person to save others. There is a saying from the Talmud, an authoritative record of rabbinic discussions on Jewish law, Jewish ethics, customs, legends and stories: “Whoever destroys a soul, it is considered as if he destroyed an entire world. And whoever saves a life, it is considered as if he saved an entire world.” We have no right to decide who lives and who dies. Yes, if we can save one person without harming others we have a moral obligation to do so. However, to save one life while sacrificing others is an arbitrary act in many ways. What if the one sacrificed is a humanitarian, well-respected and well-known person who works tirelessly for the poor and others who can’t help themselves? What if those saved are criminals who committed murder and escaped from prison. You see the dilemma? Who are we to judge who is a good person, and be saved, and who is a bad person? We should focus on leading the best possible life we can; to serve others whether through medicine, the clergy, the law, a teacher, nurse, or first-responder. Utilitarianism might be used to rationalize saving the life of five people by sacrificing one person’s life. We could say that more people benefit than are harmed by taking that action. This is consistent with act utilitarianism. On the other hand, a rule utilitarianism approach would posit that certain rules should never be violated in the name of maximizing net benefits. One rule is that it is wrong to take a life of another. Thus, rule utilitarianism is a modifying force on the literal application of act utilitarianism.

Solution Manual for Managerial Accounting 11th CANADIAN Edition by Garrison

Chapter 1 Managerial Accounting and the Business Environment Learning Objectives  
  • Describe the functions performed by managers.
  • Identify the major differences and similarities between financial and managerial accounting.
  • Explain the basic concepts of lean production and enterprise risk management.
  • Explain the nature and importance of ethics for accountants and the role of corporate social responsibility.
  • Explain how intrinsic motivation, extrinsic incentives, and cognitive biases affect employee behaviour.
  Chapter Overview   This chapter serves four main purposes:  
  • It explains the nature of managerial accounting in providing internal accounting information to support the work of management—planning, directing and motivating, and controlling.
  • It describes the nature of organizations and the role of management accountants in an organization.
  • It explains how companies are responding to a changing business environment by improving business process with the following four approaches:
    • Lean Production
    • Enterprise Risk Management
  • It discusses the importance of upholding ethical standards.
    Service-Related Examples   Company                                                                                                       Type of Business                           Text Reference Certified Professional Accountants     Accounting                                    Introduction Canadian Pacific                               Railway                                   In Business CIBC                                                 Bank                                             Ethics/Discussion Case     Assignment Topic Grid Chapter 1  
Problem Topic LO1: Functions of managers LO2: Financial vs. managerial accounting   LO3: Lean production and enterprise risk   management   LO4: Nature and importance of ethics for   accountants LO5: Intrinsic motivation, extrinsic incentives, and cognitive biases Service industry Writing component CPA adapted
E1-1 Functions Performed by Managers ü ?
E1-2 Financial and Managerial Accounting ü ?
E1-3 Enterprise Risk Management ü ?
P1-4 Cognitive Biases ü ?
P1-5 Planning and Control Activities ü J ?
P1-6 Ethics in Business ü ?
P1-7 Corporate Social Responsibility ü ?
P1-8 Intrinsic Motivation and Extrinsic Incentives ü ?
P1-9 Value Chain Analysis ü
 
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