Our Shop

Solution Manual for Managing Operations Across the Supply Chain 4th Edition by Swink

£21.00

By: Swink

Edition: 4th Edition

Format: Downloadable ZIP Fille

Resource Type: solution manual

Duration: Unlimited downloads

Delivery: Instant Download

Solution Manual for Managing Operations Across the Supply Chain 4th Edition by Swink

Chapter 1

Introduction to Managing Operations Across the Supply Chain

 Suggested Answers to Discussion Questions

  1. Review Fortune magazine’s “Most Admired” American companies for 1959, 1979, 1999, and the most current year. (The issue normally appears in August each year.) Which companies have remained on the top throughout this period? Which ones have disappeared? What do you think led to the survival or demise of these companies?

The companies that have stayed on top throughout this period are Southwest, Berkshire Hathaway, and Proctor and Gamble. UPS, Coca Cola, and GE were some of the companies that disappeared. The companies that were able to stay at the top of the list were the ones able to deal with major changes in the industry easily. In order to stay afloat in harder times, they were managed by people who understood operations management; they had a winning value proposition that was continually revitalized by the introduction of new products and services.  The companies that did not stay at the top unable to make the necessary changes so easily; perhaps their operations management was not at the caliber of the other companies able to stay at the top of the list.

  1. Select two products that you have recently purchased; one should be a service and the other a manufactured good. Think about the process that you used to make the decision to purchase each item. What product characteristics were most important to you? What operational activities determine these characteristics?

 

Student answers to this question will vary. The following is an example from one student: “Two products I have recently purchased were a sweater and a haircut. The process I used to make the decision to purchase the sweater was trying on the sweater in different colors, contemplating the purchase at home, waiting for sweater to go on sale, and then purchasing it. The process I used to make the decision about where to get my haircut included researching pictures of how I wanted my hair to look, asking advice about where to go from friends, researching online for reviews about stylists, and getting my haircut by that stylist. I wanted to make sure both products were going to satisfy me enough so that I wouldn’t regret either purchase. I had to be comfortable with both my sweater and my new hair style, luckily I was! I also wanted both my sweater and my hair style to last for a while to make them worth the cost. The operational activities that determine these characteristics are the manufacturing, shipping and selling the sweater in stores. If the sweater was poorly made and didn’t fit correctly, I would not have purchased it. If it was not available (on the shelf) I could not have purchased it.  The operational activities that determine the characteristics of my hairstyle are the stylist arriving to work on time for my appointment, washing, cutting and blow drying my hair in a way that I was expecting (having sufficient capacity so that I did not have to wait too long). Since my hair was cut and styled the way I requested, I will be returning to that hair stylist.

  1. What are the primary operations management decisions in each of the following corporations?

Quick Comparison

SettingsSolution Manual for Managing Operations Across the Supply Chain 4th Edition by Swink removeSolution Manual for Principles of Operations Management 10th Edition by Heizer removeSolution Manual for Strategic Brand Management Building Measuring 4th edition removeSolution Manual for Operations Management 6th CANADIAN Edition by Stevenson removeSolution Manual for Operations Management 13th Edition by Stevenson removeSolution Manual for Statistics for Management and Economics 11th Edition by Keller remove
Image
SKU
Rating
Price

£21.00

£25.00

£17.00£25.00

£21.00

£17.00

£13.00

Stock
Availability
Add to cart

DescriptionBy: Swink Edition: 4th Edition Format: Downloadable ZIP Fille Resource Type: solution manual Duration: Unlimited downloads Delivery: Instant DownloadBy: Heizer Edition: 10th Edition Format: Downloadable ZIP Fille Resource Type: Solution Manual Duration: Unlimited downloads Delivery: Instant DownloadEdition: 4th Edition Format: Downloadable ZIP Fille Resource Type: Solution Manual Duration: Unlimited downloads Delivery: Instant DownloadBy: Stevenson Edition: 6th Edition Format: Downloadable ZIP Fille Resource Type: Solution manual Duration: Unlimited downloads Delivery: Instant DownloadBy: Stevenson Edition: 13th Edition Format: Downloadable ZIP Fille Resource Type: Solution Manual Duration: Unlimited downloads Delivery: Instant DownloadEdition: 11th Edition Format: Downloadable ZIP Fille Resource Type: Solution manual Duration: Unlimited downloads Delivery: Instant Download
Content

Solution Manual for Managing Operations Across the Supply Chain 4th Edition by Swink

Chapter 1 Introduction to Managing Operations Across the Supply Chain  Suggested Answers to Discussion Questions
  1. Review Fortune magazine’s “Most Admired” American companies for 1959, 1979, 1999, and the most current year. (The issue normally appears in August each year.) Which companies have remained on the top throughout this period? Which ones have disappeared? What do you think led to the survival or demise of these companies?
The companies that have stayed on top throughout this period are Southwest, Berkshire Hathaway, and Proctor and Gamble. UPS, Coca Cola, and GE were some of the companies that disappeared. The companies that were able to stay at the top of the list were the ones able to deal with major changes in the industry easily. In order to stay afloat in harder times, they were managed by people who understood operations management; they had a winning value proposition that was continually revitalized by the introduction of new products and services.  The companies that did not stay at the top unable to make the necessary changes so easily; perhaps their operations management was not at the caliber of the other companies able to stay at the top of the list.
  1. Select two products that you have recently purchased; one should be a service and the other a manufactured good. Think about the process that you used to make the decision to purchase each item. What product characteristics were most important to you? What operational activities determine these characteristics?
  Student answers to this question will vary. The following is an example from one student: “Two products I have recently purchased were a sweater and a haircut. The process I used to make the decision to purchase the sweater was trying on the sweater in different colors, contemplating the purchase at home, waiting for sweater to go on sale, and then purchasing it. The process I used to make the decision about where to get my haircut included researching pictures of how I wanted my hair to look, asking advice about where to go from friends, researching online for reviews about stylists, and getting my haircut by that stylist. I wanted to make sure both products were going to satisfy me enough so that I wouldn’t regret either purchase. I had to be comfortable with both my sweater and my new hair style, luckily I was! I also wanted both my sweater and my hair style to last for a while to make them worth the cost. The operational activities that determine these characteristics are the manufacturing, shipping and selling the sweater in stores. If the sweater was poorly made and didn’t fit correctly, I would not have purchased it. If it was not available (on the shelf) I could not have purchased it.  The operational activities that determine the characteristics of my hairstyle are the stylist arriving to work on time for my appointment, washing, cutting and blow drying my hair in a way that I was expecting (having sufficient capacity so that I did not have to wait too long). Since my hair was cut and styled the way I requested, I will be returning to that hair stylist.
  1. What are the primary operations management decisions in each of the following corporations?

Solution Manual for Principles of Operations Management 10th Edition by Heizer

C H A P T E R 1 Operations and Productivity DISCUSSION QUESTIONS 1. The text suggests four reasons to study OM. We want to understand (1) how people organize themselves for productive enterprise, (2) how goods and services are produced, (3) what operations managers do, and (4) this costly part of our economy and most enterprises. 2. Possible responses include: Adam Smith (work specialization/division of labor), Charles Babbage (work specialization/division of labor), Frederick W. Taylor (scientific management), Walter Shewart (statistical sampling and quality control), Henry Ford (moving assembly line), Charles Sorensen (moving assembly line), Frank and Lillian Gilbreth (motion study), Eli Whitney (standardization). 3. See references in the answer to question 2. 4. The actual charts will differ, depending on the specific organization the student chooses to describe. The important thing is for students to recognize that all organizations require, to a greater or lesser extent, (a) the three primary functions of operations, finance/accounting, and marketing; and (b) that the emphasis or detailed breakdown of these functions is dependent on the specific competitive strategy employed by the firm. 5. The answer to this question may be similar to that for question 4. Here, however, the student should be encouraged to utilize a more detailed knowledge of a past employer and indicate on the chart additional information such as the number of persons employed to perform the various functions and, perhaps, the position of the functional areas within the overall organization hierarchy. 6. The basic functions of a firm are marketing, accounting/ finance, and operations. An interesting class discussion: “Do all firms/organizations (private, government, not-for-profit) perform these three functions?” The authors’ hypothesis is yes, they do. 7. The 10 decisions of operations management are product design, quality, process, location, layout, human resources, supplychain management, inventory, scheduling (aggregate and short term), maintenance. We find this structure an excellent way to help students organize and learn the material. 8. Four areas that are important to improving labor productivity are: (1) basic education (basic reading and math skills), (2) diet of the labor force, (3) social overhead that makes labor available (water, sanitation, transportation, etc.), and (4) maintaining and expanding the skills necessary for changing technology and knowledge, as well as for teamwork and motivation. 9. Productivity is harder to measure when the task becomes more intellectual. A knowledge society implies that work is more intellectual and therefore harder to measure. Because the U.S. (and many other countries) are increasingly “knowledge” societies, productivity is harder to measure. Using labor hours as a measure of productivity for a postindustrial society vs. an industrial or agriculture society is very different. For example, decades spent developing a marvelous new drug or winning a very difficult legal case on intellectual property rights may be significant for postindustrial societies, but not show much in the way of productivity improvement measured in labor hours. 10. Productivity is difficult to measure because precise units of measure may be lacking, quality may not be consistent, and exogenous variables may change. 11. Mass customization is the flexibility to produce in order to meet specific customer demands, without sacrificing the low cost of a product oriented process. Rapid product development is a source of competitive advantage. Both rely on agility within the organization. 12. Labor productivity in the service sector is hard to improve because (1) many services are labor intensive and (2) they are individually (personally) processed (the customer is paying for that service—the hair cut), (3) it may be an intellectual task performed by professionals, (4) it is often difficult to mechanize and automate, and (5) often difficult to evaluate for quality. 13. Taco Bell designed meals that were easy to prepare; with actual cooking and food preparation done elsewhere; automation to save preparation time; reduced floor space; manager training to increase span of control.
ETHICAL DILEMMA
With most of the ethical dilemmas in the text, the instructor should generate plenty of discussion with this dilemma. The authors are hesitant to endorse a particular correct answer. And students may well be on both side of this dilemma. Many students will be inclined to accept the child labor laws of their home country. For instance, Americans accept teenagers working. But Germans (and others) are more likely to expect teenagers to be home studying or in an apprentice program; they frown upon teenagers working. Students raised in more affluent environments may not understand children working. However, those who had to scrape by in their youth or had parents that did may be more sympathetic to 10-year-olds working. From an economic and self-preservation perspective many 10-year-olds do work and need to work. There are still a lot of poor people in the world. Such a decision may endorse the moral philosophy perspective defined as a Utilitarianism decision. A utilitarianism decision defines acceptable actions as those that maximize total utility, i.e., the greatest good for the greatest number of people.

2 CHAPTER 1 OP E R A T I O N S A N D P R O D U C T I V I T Y

6.6 (c) Increase in productivity = = 33.0% 20 From a U.S. corporate management perspective, companies cannot tolerate the publicity that goes with hiring 10-year-olds. These companies need to have standards that prohibit such actions by their subcontractors. The moral philosophy perspective might call this the virtue ethics position—the decision that a mature person with a good moral character would deem correct. END-OF-CHAPTER PROBLEMS 120 boxes (a) = 3.0 boxes/hour 40 hours 1.1 125 boxes (b) = 3.125 boxes/hour 40 hours (c) Change in productivity = 0.125 boxes/hour (d) 0.125 boxes Percentage change = = 4.166% 3.0 1.2 (a) Labor productivity is 160 valves/80 hours = 2 valves per hour. (b) New labor productivity = 180 valves / 80 hours = 2.25 valves per hour (c) Percentage change in productivity = .25 valves / 2 valves = 12.5% 1.3 So 57,600 L = = 200 (160)(12)(0.15) laborers employed 1.4 Bureau of Labor Statistics (stats.bls.gov) is probably as good a place to start as any. Results will vary for each year, but overall data for the economy will range from .9% to 4.8% and mfg. could be as high as 5% and services between 1% and 2%. The data will vary even more for months or quarters. The data are frequently revised, often substantially. Units produced 100 pkgs (a) = = 20 pkgs/hour Input 5 1.5 133 pkgs (b) = 26.6 pkgs per hour 5 [(1,000/4,850) (1,000/4,510)] (1,000/4,850) − = 0.206–0.222 –0.016 = = 0.078 fewer resources 0.206 0.206 ⇒ 7.8% improvement* * with rounding to 3 decimal places. Output Productivity = Input

Solution Manual for Strategic Brand Management Building Measuring 4th edition

Design a valuable brand star by building, measuring, and managing brand equity Kevin LeneKeller is one of the global leaders in strategic management and integrated marketing communications. In Strategic Brand Management: Creating, Managing, and Monitoring Buildings, 4thEdition by Kevin lane Keller flash at the browser from a consumer perspective and provides a framework that helps learners and managers identify brand quality, Define and measure. Using a gateway from the knowledge of both learning and industry experts, the text conveys on reputable examples and commercial studies of markets in the US and around the world.          Strategic brand management by Kevin Lene Keller exposes Brand is basically a dimension differ in some way from other products designed to meet some needs. These differed encase may be tangible and non-tangible related to an item quality of brand—-or more symbolic and emotional, a customer this thing keep in mind before purchasing a product. It usually contains several examples on each topic, and 75 short branching’s of branding that recognizes successful series and explains why they are so. Case readers will get acquainted with real-life news with Leaky Dockers, Intel Corporation, Nivea, Nike, and Starbucks. Brand managers to industry professionals for market marketing executives. Strategic brand management by Kevin Lene Keller exposes Brand is basically a dimension differ in some way from other products designed to meet some needs. These differed encase may be tangible and non-tangible related to an item quality of brand—-or more symbolic and emotional, a customer this thing keep in mind before purchasing a product. Industry thinking and developments, brand genuine and strategic branding research combines a comprehensive theoretical foundation with this comprehensive ongoing and long-term best-practice decision. Long-term exclusive brand strategy. Generally focused on how and why, it provides specific strategic guidance for planning, building, measuring, and managing brand equity.

Solution Manual for Operations Management 6th CANADIAN Edition by Stevenson

Chapter No 1 INTRODUCTION TO Operations Management Teaching Notes The initial meeting with the class (the first chapter) is primarily to overview the course (and textbook), and to introduce the instructor and his/her interest in Operations Management (OM). The course outline (syllabus), the objectives of the course and topics, chapters, and pages of text covered in the course, as well as problems/mini-cases, to be done in class, videos to watch, Excel worksheets to use, etc. are announced to the class. Many students may know little about OM and the types of jobs available. This point can be addressed in order to generate enthusiasm for the course. The Learning Objectives at the beginning of the chapter indicate the highlights of the chapter. Answers to Discussion and Review Questions
  1. Operations management is the management of processes (i.e., the sequence of activities and resources)that create goods and/or provide services.
 
  1. Production/operations planner/scheduler/controller, demand planner (forecaster), quality specialist, logistics coordinator, purchasing agent/buyer, supply chain manager, materials planner, inventory clerk/manager, production/operations manager.
 
  1. a.       Because a large % of a company’s expenses occur in the operations, e.g., purchasing materials and workforce salaries, more efficient operations can result in large increases in profits.
  2. A number of management jobs are in OM.
  3. Activities in all other areas of any organization are all interrelated with OM.
  4. Operations innovations lead to the marketplace and strategic benefits.
  5. The three major functions of organizations are operations, finance, and marketing. Operations is concerned with the creation of goods and services identified by marketing, finance is concerned with the provision of funds necessary for operations and investment of extra funds, and marketing is concerned with promoting and/or selling goods or services.
  6. The operations function consists of all activities that are directly related to producing goods or providing services. It adds value during the transformation process (the difference between the cost of inputs and the price of outputs). An operations manager manages the transformation function.                                                             He/she is responsible for planning and using the resources (labor, machines, and materials). The kind of work that operations managers do varies from organization to organization (largely because of the different goods or services involved). For example, a store/restaurant manager is in effect an operations manager. See Figure 1-6 for examples of typical activities performed by operations managers.
  7. Design decisions are usually strategic and long term (1–5 years or so ahead), whereas planning and control decisions are shorter term. In particular, planning decisions are tactical and medium-term (1–12 months or so ahead), and control decisions (including scheduling and execution) are short term (1–12 weeks or so ahead). Design involves decisions that relate to goods and service design, capacity, acquisition of equipment, the arrangement of departments, and location of facilities.Planning/control activities involve management of personnel, quality control/assurance, inventory planning and control, production planning, and scheduling.
 

Solution Manual for Operations Management 13th Edition by Stevenson

chapter 19 Linear Programming Teaching Notes The main goal of this supplement is to provide students with an overview of the types of problems that have been solved using linear programming (LP). In the process of learning the different types of problems that can be solved with LP, students also must develop a very basic understanding of the assumptions and special features of LP problems of management test bank. Students also should learn the basics of developing and formulating linear programming models for simple problems, solve two-variable linear programming problems by the graphical procedure, and interpret the resulting outcome. In the process of solving these graphical problems, we must stress the role and importance of extreme points in obtaining an optimal solution. Improvements in computer hardware and software technology and the popularity of the software package Microsoft Excel make the use of computers in solving linear programming problems accessible to many users. Therefore, a main goal of the chapter should be to allow students to solve linear programming problems using Excel. More importantly, we need to ensure that students are able to interpret the results obtained from Excel or any another computer software package. Answers to Discussion and Review Questions
  1. Linear programming is well-suited to constrained optimization problems that satisfy the following assumptions:
  2. Linearity: The impact of decision variables is linear in constraints and the objective function.
  3. Divisibility: Noninteger values of decision variables are acceptable.
  4. Certainty: Values of parameters are known and constant.
  5. Nonnegativity: Negative values of decision variables are unacceptable.
  6. The “area of feasibility,” or feasible solution space is the set of all combinations of values of the decision variables that satisfy all constraints. Hence, this area is determined by the constraints.
  7. Redundant constraints do not affect the feasible region for a linear programming problem. Therefore, they can be dropped from a linear programming problem without affecting the feasible solution space or the optimal solution.
  8. An iso-cost line represents the set of all possible combinations of two input decision variables that result in a given cost. Likewise, an iso-profit line represents all of the possible combinations of two output variables that results in a given profit.
  9. Sliding an objective function line towards the origin represents a decrease in its value (i.e., lower cost, profit, etc.). Sliding an objective function line away from the origin represents an increase in its value.
  10. a. Basic variable: In a linear programming solution, it is a variable not equal to zero.
  11. Shadow price: It is the change in the value of the objective function for a one-unit change in the right-hand-side value of a constraint.
  12. Range of feasibility: The range of values for the right-hand-side value of a constraint over which the shadow price remains the same.
  13. Range of optimality: The range of values over which the solution quantities of all the decision variables remain the same.
Solution to Problems
  1. a. Graph the constraints and the objective function:
  Material constraint: 6x1 4x2 ≤ 48 Replace the inequality sign with an equal sign: 6x1 4x2 = 48 Set x1 = 0 and solve for x2: 6(0) 4x2 = 48 4x2 = 48 x2 = 12 One point on the line is (0, 12). Set x2 = 0 and solve for x1: 6x1 4(0) = 48 6x1 = 48 x1 = 8 A second point on the line is (8,0).   Labor constraint: 4x1 8x2 ≤ 80 Replace the inequality sign with an equal sign: 4x1 8x2 = 80 Set x1 = 0 and solve for x2: 4(0) 8x2 = 80 8x2 = 80 x2 = 10 One point on the line is (0, 10). Set x2 = 0 and solve for x1: 4x1 8(0) = 80 4x1 = 80 x1 = 20 A second point on the line is (20, 0).   Objective function: Let 4x1 3x2 = 24. Set x1 = 0 and solve for x2: 4(0) 3x2 = 24 3x2 = 24 x2 = 8 One point on the line is (0, 8). Set x2 = 0 and solve for x1: 4x1 3(0) = 24 4x1 = 24 x1 = 6 A second point on the line is (6, 0).   The graph and the feasible solution space (shaded) are shown below:

Solution Manual for Statistics for Management and Economics 11th Edition by Keller

Chapter 1

1.2 Statistics for Management and Economics  Descriptive techniques summarize data. Inferential techniques draw inferences about a population based on sample data. 1.3 Statistics for Management and Economics  a The population is the 25,000 registered voters. b The sample is the 200 registered voters. cThe 48% figure is the statistic   1.4 Statistics for Management and Economics  a The population is the complete production run. b The sample is comprised of the 1,000 chips. c The parameter is the proportion of defective chips in the production run. d The statistic is the proportion of defective chips in the sample. e The 10% figure refers to the parameter. fThe 7.5% figure refers to the statistic. g We can estimate the population proportion is 7.5%. Statistical inference methods will allow us to determine whether we have enough statistical evidence to reject the claim.as the sample proportion.   1.5 Statistics for Management and Economics  Draw a random sample from the population of graduates who have majored in your subject and a random sample of graduates of other majors and record their highest salary offers.   1.6 Statistics for Management and Economics  a Flip the coin (say 100 times) and record the number of heads (assuming that you are interested in the number of heads). b The population is composed of the theoretical result of flipping the coin an infinite number of times and recording either “heads” or “tails”. cThe sample is comprised of the “heads” and “tails” in the sample. d The parameter is the proportion of heads (again assuming that your interest is the number of heads rather than tails) in the population. e The statistic is the proportion of heads (or tails depending on the choice made in part d). fThe sample statistic can be used to judge whether the coin is actually fair.   1.7 a We would conclude that the coin is not fair. b We may conclude that there is some evidence that the coin is not fair.   1.8 aThe population is made up of the propane mileage of all the cars in the fleet. b The parameter is the mean propane mileage of all the cars in the fleet. c The sample is composed of the propane mileage of the 50 cars. d The statistic is the mean propane mileage of the 50 cars in the sample. e We can use the sample statistic to estimate the population parameter.
Weight
DimensionsN/AN/AN/AN/AN/AN/A
Additional information
Select the fields to be shown. Others will be hidden. Drag and drop to rearrange the order.
  • Image
  • SKU
  • Rating
  • Price
  • Stock
  • Availability
  • Add to cart
  • Description
  • Content
  • Weight
  • Dimensions
  • Additional information
  • Attributes
  • Custom attributes
  • Custom fields
Click outside to hide the comparison bar
Compare