Our Shop

Solution Manual for Practical Management Science 6th Edition by Winston

£17.00

By: Winston

Edition: 6th Edition

Format: Downloadable ZIP Fille

Resource Type: Solution manual

Duration: Unlimited downloads

Delivery: Instant Download

Solution Manual for Practical Management Science 6th Edition by Winston

Table of Contents 1. Introduction to Modeling.

2. Introduction to Spreadsheet Modeling.

3. Introduction to Optimization Modeling.

4. Linear Programming Models.

5. Network Models.

6. Optimization Models with Integer Variables.

7. Nonlinear Optimization Models.

8. Evolutionary Solver: An Alternative Optimization Procedure.

9. Decision Making Under Uncertainty.

10. Introduction to Simulation Modeling.

11. Simulation Models.

12. Queueing Models.

13. Regression and Forecasting Models.

14. Data Mining 15. Project Management

16. Multiobjective Decision Making

17. Inventory and Supply Chain Models

Quick Comparison

SettingsSolution Manual for Practical Management Science 6th Edition by Winston removeSolution Manual for Concepts of Database Management 9th Edition by Starks removeSolution Manual for Operations Management 2nd Edition by Cachon removeSolution Manual for An Introduction to Management Science 15th Edition by Anderson removeSolution Manual for Operations Management 6th CANADIAN Edition by Stevenson removeSolution Manual for Principles of Supply Chain Management 5th Edition by Wisner remove
Image
SKU
Rating
Price

£17.00

£25.00

£21.00

£17.00

£21.00

£17.00

Stock
Availability
Add to cart

DescriptionBy: Winston Edition: 6th Edition Format: Downloadable ZIP Fille Resource Type: Solution manual Duration: Unlimited downloads Delivery: Instant DownloadBy: Starks Edition: 9th Edition Format: Downloadable ZIP Fille Resource Type: Solution Manual Duration: Unlimited downloads Delivery: Instant DownloadBy: Cachon Edition: 2nd Edition Format: Downloadable ZIP Fille Resource Type: Solution Manual Duration: Unlimited downloads Delivery: Instant DownloadBy: Anderson Edition: 15th Edition Format: Downloadable ZIP Fille Resource Type: Solution manual Duration: Unlimited downloads Delivery: Instant DownloadBy: Stevenson Edition: 6th Edition Format: Downloadable ZIP Fille Resource Type: Solution manual Duration: Unlimited downloads Delivery: Instant DownloadBy: Wisner Edition: 5th Edition Format: Downloadable ZIP Fille Resource Type: Solution manual Duration: Unlimited downloads Delivery: Instant Download
Content

Solution Manual for Practical Management Science 6th Edition by Winston

Table of Contents 1. Introduction to Modeling. 2. Introduction to Spreadsheet Modeling. 3. Introduction to Optimization Modeling. 4. Linear Programming Models. 5. Network Models. 6. Optimization Models with Integer Variables. 7. Nonlinear Optimization Models. 8. Evolutionary Solver: An Alternative Optimization Procedure. 9. Decision Making Under Uncertainty. 10. Introduction to Simulation Modeling. 11. Simulation Models. 12. Queueing Models. 13. Regression and Forecasting Models. 14. Data Mining 15. Project Management 16. Multiobjective Decision Making 17. Inventory and Supply Chain Models

Solution Manual for Concepts of Database Management 9th Edition by Starks

Chapter One: Introduction to Database Management

A Guide to this Instructor’s Manual:

We have designed this Instructor’s Manual to supplement and enhance your teaching experience through classroom activities and a cohesive chapter summary. This document is organized chronologically, using the same heading in red that you see in the textbook. Under each heading, you will find (in order): Lecture Notes that summarize the section, Figures and Boxes found in the section, if any, Teacher Tips, Classroom Activities, and Lab Activities. Pay special attention to TeacherTips and activities geared towards quizzing your students, enhancing their critical thinking skills, and encouraging experimentation within the software. In addition to this Instructor’s Manual, our Instructor’s Resources also include PowerPoint Presentations, Test Banks, Solutions to Exercises, and other supplements to aid in your teaching experience. You can access Instructor Resources via the Web at login.cengage.com. Table of Contents
Chapter Objectives 1
1: BITS Company Background 1
4: Database Solution 2
10: Database Management Systems 3
13: Advantages of Database Processing 4
15: Disadvantages of Database Processing 5
15: BigData 5
16: Introduction to the colonial Adventure ToursDatabase Case 6
21: Introduction to the Sports Physical Therapy Database Case 6
End of Chapter Material 7
Glossary of Key Terms 7

Chapter Objectives

The learning objectives for chapter OneCare:  
  • Introduce Burk IT Solutions (BITS), the company that is used as the basis for many of the examples throughout the text
  • Introduce basic database terminology
  • Describe database management systems (DBMSs)
  • Explain the advantages and disadvantages of database processing
  • Introduce Colonial Adventure Tours, the company that is used in a case that appears at the end of each chapter
  • Introduce Sports Physical Therapy, the company that is used in another case that appears at the end of each chapter
1: BITS Company Background LECTURE NOTES
  • Describe the BITS company
  • Use Figure 1-1 to illustrate the problems associated with using spreadsheets to maintain this data
    • Redundancy
    • Difficulty accessing related data
    • Limited security features
    • Multiple updates
    • Size limitations
  • Define redundancy
    • Duplication of data or the storing of the same data in more than one place
  • Use the embedded Q & A on page 2 to discuss the problems redundancy causes
    • Wastes space
    • Makes changes more cumbersome
    • Can lead to inconsistencies
  • Use Figure 1-2 to introduce the type of data that BITS must be able to store and retrieve
    • Point out that the amounts in the Total column in Figure 1-2 are not stored in the database but are calculated
FIGURES: 1-1, 1-2 TEACHER TIPS Students will work with BITS in every chapter. They should become familiar with this fictitious company and the type of data it needs to maintain. The same type of data needs to be stored by other consulting companies or service providers. If you want to personalize the database, you have students add their name as a customer or you can have them rename the database using their own name rather than BITS. CLASSROOM ACTIVITIES
  1. Group Activities: Place students in groups and distribute order forms from local companies and/or retail stores. Ask the groups to determine the data the company must store and the data that is calculated.
  2. Class Discussion: Ask students what other types of data a service providers such as BITSwould need to maintain.
  3. Critical Thinking: BITS needs to maintain data on the consultants and what each one specializes in. Should BITS store this data in a spreadsheet? Why or why not?
4: Database Solution LECTURE NOTES
  • Define entity
    • Person, place, object, event, or idea for which you want to store and process data
  • Define attribute
    • Characteristic or property of an entity
    • Also called a field or column in many database systems
  • Use Figure 1-3 to point out the Consultant and Client entity and the attributes for each entity
  • Define relationship
    • An association between entities
  • Define one-to-many relationship
    • Each rep is associated with many customers, but each customer is associated with only one rep
  • Use Figure 1-4 to explain the one-to-many relationship between consultants and clients
  • Define data file
    • A file used to store data, such as a spreadsheet or word-processed document
  • Define database
    • A structure that can store information about multiple types of entities, the attributes of those entities, and the relationships among the entities
  • Point out the differences between a data file and a database
  • Use Figure 1-5 to review the tables (entities) that make up the BITS database
    • Consultant, Client, Tasks, OrderLine, Work Orders
  • Use Figure 1-6 to illustrate the problems with storing orders in the alternative table structure
  • Review the embedded Q & As on pages 8 through 9
  • Define entity-relationship (E-R)diagram
    • A visual way to represent a database
  • Use Figure 1-7 to illustrate an E-R diagram and review the entities, attributes, and relationships in the BITS database
FIGURES: 1-3, 1-4, 1-5, 1-6, 1-7 TEACHER TIPS Database concepts such as entity, attribute, and relationship are often difficult for students to grasp. Use examples that students can relate to, for example, a school database or a database maintained by the state department of public safety (driver’s licenses). A good analogy to use is an employment application form. The items that we complete on the form are attributes, and the completed application (entity example) describes the person who completed it. Figure 1-5 lists the five tables that make up the BITS database. Each table represents an entity. The data in the tables are related through common fields. It is these relationships that allow the user to access data from more than one table and produce reports, queries, and forms. Encourage students to use the embedded Q & As to test their understanding of the concepts as well as the design of the BITS database.  

Solution Manual for Operations Management 2nd Edition by Cachon

Chapter 1 – Teaching Plan Introduction to operations management Specific Learning objectives LO1-1: Identify the drivers of customer utility LO1-2: Explaininefficiencies and determine if a firm is on the efficient frontier LO1-3: Explain the three system inhibitors LO1-4: Explain what work in operations management looks like LO1-5: Articulate the key operational decisions a firm needs to make to match supply with demand   What Students Learn in this Chapter This chapter is the beginning of the book, and most likely the corresponding session is the first session in the student’s first exposure to operations management. The goal of the session is for students to gain some appreciation of the type of operational decisions that a business has to make and to provide them some idea of what it will take to make these decisions well. To achieve this goal, we like to start with a perspective the student is familiar with. In most undergraduate settings, students will have little or no work experience. So, rather than starting with the perspective of the business, we find it more engaging to start with the perspective of the consumer. Faculty and students alike, all of us have been in the role of the customer in consumer-facing industries, such as restaurants, travel, healthcare, entertainment, or education. We suggest using the example of restaurants. Even if students have work experience, a common experience/example is helpful for discussion and all of us have been in some form of a restaurant. The book chapter takes the example of “where do you want to go for lunch today?” to establish the different dimensions driving customer utility. Once we understand what consumers value, we can start talking about the dimensions of operational performance. Students will see that there are multiple dimensions of operational performance. Some operations focus on responsiveness, some on quality, some on efficiency, etc. Unlike the case of finance, where we all agree that more profits are better than fewer profits, students will appreciate that there exist trade-offs among the operational dimensions of performance. Subway is operationally not better or worse than a five-star restaurant. It simply has a different strategy. The presence of trade-off then sets up the efficient frontier framework. Some firms are better at multiple things, others are worse. Typically, students have services that they like a lot (e.g. Starbucks or Chipotle) and oftentimes, those are services that are also financially successful. This allows for a discussion of what makes these services successful, which allows the faculty to introduce concepts such as waste, variability, and inflexibility.   Relationship to other Chapters This chapter is related to: Since this is the first chapter, it obviously does not build on other chapters. This chapter is the foundation for: The idea of the efficient frontier and the three system inhibitors is coming up throughout the book/the course. Introducing them on the first day of class is helpful, though not required.   Proposed Time Line Any time line will depend on the context of teaching, including the class size, the choice of exercise or case, the level of prior knowledge of the students, and the teaching style of the faculty. We have used the following time line for various audiences. This includes academic settings (business students), but also professional development settings with participants that learnt this material not to prepare for a test but to advance their careers. 0:00        Opening exercise (Mortgage exercise) 0:20        Dimensions of performance 0:30        The efficient frontier/Pareto dominance 0:40        The three system inhibitors 1:00        Course overview and course logistics   Preparation before class Set up exercise if you plan to use one. If mortgage exercise is used, send out an email to students ahead of time, announcing that (a) on time arrival is critical for the exercise (b) they should not touch any paper on the tables. If you plan to discuss the restaurant example, it might be helpful to do a quick Google news search on the big restaurant chains to have some current updates/examples.

Solution Manual for An Introduction to Management Science 15th Edition by Anderson

Chapter 1 Introduction    Learning Objectives  
  1. Develop a general understanding of the management science/operations research approach to decision making.
 
  1. Realize that quantitative applications begin with a problem situation.
 
  1. Obtain a brief introduction to quantitative techniques and their frequency of use in practice.
 
  1. Understand that managerial problem situations have both quantitative and qualitative considerations that are important in the decision making process.
 
  1. Learn about models in terms of what they are and why they are useful (the emphasis is on mathematical models).
 
  1. Identify the step-by-step procedure that is used in most quantitative approaches to decision making.
 
  1. Learn about basic models of cost, revenue, and profit and be able to compute the breakeven point.
 
  1. Obtain an introduction to the use of computer software packages such as Microsoft Excel in applying quantitative methods to decision making.
 
  1. Understand the following terms:
  model                                                     infeasible solution objective function                               management science constraint                                             operations research deterministic model                             fixed cost stochastic model                                 variable cost feasible solution                                  breakeven point   Solutions:  
  1. Management science and operations research, terms used almost interchangeably, are broad disciplines that employ scientific methodology in managerial decision making or problem solving. Drawing upon a variety of disciplines (behavioral, mathematical, etc.), management science and operations research combine quantitative and qualitative considerations in order to establish policies and decisions that are in the best interest of the organization.
 
  1. Define the problem
  Identify the alternatives   Determine the criteria   Evaluate the alternatives   Choose an alternative   For further discussion see section 1.3  
  1. See section 1.2.
 
  1. A quantitative approach should be considered because the problem is large, complex, important, new and repetitive.
 
  1. Models usually have time, cost, and risk advantages over experimenting with actual situations.
 
  1. Model (a) may be quicker to formulate, easier to solve, and/or more easily understood.
 
  1. Let d = distance
m = miles per gallon c = cost per gallon,  

Solution Manual for Operations Management 6th CANADIAN Edition by Stevenson

Chapter No 1 INTRODUCTION TO Operations Management Teaching Notes The initial meeting with the class (the first chapter) is primarily to overview the course (and textbook), and to introduce the instructor and his/her interest in Operations Management (OM). The course outline (syllabus), the objectives of the course and topics, chapters, and pages of text covered in the course, as well as problems/mini-cases, to be done in class, videos to watch, Excel worksheets to use, etc. are announced to the class. Many students may know little about OM and the types of jobs available. This point can be addressed in order to generate enthusiasm for the course. The Learning Objectives at the beginning of the chapter indicate the highlights of the chapter. Answers to Discussion and Review Questions
  1. Operations management is the management of processes (i.e., the sequence of activities and resources)that create goods and/or provide services.
 
  1. Production/operations planner/scheduler/controller, demand planner (forecaster), quality specialist, logistics coordinator, purchasing agent/buyer, supply chain manager, materials planner, inventory clerk/manager, production/operations manager.
 
  1. a.       Because a large % of a company’s expenses occur in the operations, e.g., purchasing materials and workforce salaries, more efficient operations can result in large increases in profits.
  2. A number of management jobs are in OM.
  3. Activities in all other areas of any organization are all interrelated with OM.
  4. Operations innovations lead to the marketplace and strategic benefits.
  5. The three major functions of organizations are operations, finance, and marketing. Operations is concerned with the creation of goods and services identified by marketing, finance is concerned with the provision of funds necessary for operations and investment of extra funds, and marketing is concerned with promoting and/or selling goods or services.
  6. The operations function consists of all activities that are directly related to producing goods or providing services. It adds value during the transformation process (the difference between the cost of inputs and the price of outputs). An operations manager manages the transformation function.                                                             He/she is responsible for planning and using the resources (labor, machines, and materials). The kind of work that operations managers do varies from organization to organization (largely because of the different goods or services involved). For example, a store/restaurant manager is in effect an operations manager. See Figure 1-6 for examples of typical activities performed by operations managers.
  7. Design decisions are usually strategic and long term (1–5 years or so ahead), whereas planning and control decisions are shorter term. In particular, planning decisions are tactical and medium-term (1–12 months or so ahead), and control decisions (including scheduling and execution) are short term (1–12 weeks or so ahead). Design involves decisions that relate to goods and service design, capacity, acquisition of equipment, the arrangement of departments, and location of facilities.Planning/control activities involve management of personnel, quality control/assurance, inventory planning and control, production planning, and scheduling.
 

Solution Manual for Principles of Supply Chain Management 5th Edition by Wisner

PRINCIPLES OF SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT: A BALANCED APPROACH, 5thEd. Answers to Questions/Problems Chapter One

Discussion Questions

  1. Define the term supply chain management in your own words, and list its most important activities.
Ans.: The Supply-Chain Council’s definition of supply chain management is“[m]anaging supply and demand, sourcing raw materials and parts, manufacturing and assembly, warehousing and inventory tracking, order entry and order management, distribution across all channels, and delivery to the customer. These are also the most important activities, however integration of key supply chain processes might also be included in there.
  1. Can a small business like a local sandwich or bicycle shop benefit from practicing supply chain management?What would they most likely concentrate on?
Ans.: Yes, any organization can implement at least some of the important concepts. A good place to start is the rationalization or reduction of the supply base. Small businesses might also want to concentrate on customers as a starting point.
  1. Describe and draw a supply chain for a bicycle repair shop and list the important supply chain members.
Ans.: This will vary from student to student, but should include for instance parts suppliers, bicycle suppliers and other suppliers (ie, helmet suppliers) and services (ie, repair services) as 1st-tier suppliers and bicycle owners as 1st-tier customers.
  1. Can a bicycle repair shop have more than one supply chain? Explain.
Ans.: Yes. Every repair item the firm stocks has potentially a different supply chain associated with it.
  1. What roles do “collaboration” and “trust” play in the practice of supply chain management?
Ans.: This is essential for process integration. Sharing information and determining joint strategies is part of the integration/collaboration process, and to do this, trust must be present between the customer/focal firm/supplier.
  1. Why don’t firms just become more vertically integrated (eg. buy out suppliers and customers), instead of trying to manage their supply chains?
Ans.: This could cause a loss of focus and keep managers/employees from doing their core competencies, resulting in loss of performance.
  1. What types of organizations would benefit the most from practicing supply chain management? What sorts of improvements could be expected?
 Ans.: Firms with many suppliers, many complex products, large inventories and many customers (in other words, firms with many supply chains). Gains would be lower purchasing costs, lower carrying costs, better product quality, and better customer service.
  1. What are the benefits of supply chain management?
Ans.: Reduction of the bullwhip effect, better buyer/supplier relationships, better quality, lower costs, better customer service, higher demand, more profits.
  1. Can nonprofit, educational, or government organizations benefit from supply chain management? How?
Ans.: Yes. All services and organizations can benefit in terms of at least better customer service, better inventory management, and cheaper purchase prices.
Weight
DimensionsN/AN/AN/AN/AN/AN/A
Additional information
Select the fields to be shown. Others will be hidden. Drag and drop to rearrange the order.
  • Image
  • SKU
  • Rating
  • Price
  • Stock
  • Availability
  • Add to cart
  • Description
  • Content
  • Weight
  • Dimensions
  • Additional information
  • Attributes
  • Custom attributes
  • Custom fields
Click outside to hide the comparison bar
Compare