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Solution Manual for The Practice of Statistics for Business and Economics 4th Edition by Moore

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Solution Manual for The Practice of Statistics for Business and Economics 4th Edition by Moore

Chapter 1: Examining Distributions Practice of Statistics for Business and Economics 
1.1 The value of the coupon is computed by subtracting the DiscPrice from the RegPrice. It is quantitative
because arithmetic operations, like the average value, would make sense.
1.2 The regular price for the Smokey Grill Ribs coupon is 20, the discount price is 11.
1.3 Who: The cases are coupons, there are 7 cases. What: There are 6 variables—ID, Type, Name, Item,
RegPrice, and DiscPrice. Only RegPrice and DiscPrice have units in dollars. Why: The data might be
used to compare coupons to one another to see which are better. We would not want to draw conclusions
about other coupons not listed.
1.4 The cases are apartments. There are 5 variables: Monthly rent-quantitative, Fitness center-categorical,
Pets allowed-categorical, # of Bedrooms-quantitative, Distance to campus-quantitative.
1.5 (a) If you were interested in attending a large college, you would want to know the number of
graduates. (b) If you were interested in making sure you graduate, you would want to know the
graduation rate.
1.6 (a) The cases are summer jobs. (b) Variables might include: position, company, hourly wage, whether
the job is on or off campus, hours per week, other answers are possible. (c) position—categorical,
company-categorical, hourly wage-quantitative, on or off campus-categorical, hours per weekquantitative, other answers are possible. (d) We could use a number as a label. The reason for doing so is
there could be several jobs with the same company or position that you would need to differentiate from
one another. (e) Who: part (a) answer, What: part (b) and (c), Why: To compile a list of available summer
jobs and possibly compare them. We would not want to draw conclusions about other jobs not listed.
1.7 (a) The cases are employees. (b) Employee identification number—label, last name—label, first
name—label, middle initial—label, department—categorical, number of years—quantitative, salary—
quantitative, education—categorical, age—quantitative. (c) Sample data would vary.
1.8 Answers will vary.
1.9 (a) Quantitative. (b) Quantitative. (c) Quantitative. (d) Quantitative. (e) Categorical. (f) Categorical.
For all quantitative variables, numerical summaries would be meaningful; for categorical variables,
numerical summaries are NOT meaningful.
2 Chapter 1 Examining Distributions
1.10 Answers will vary. 1. Rate the customer service of the restaurant—quantitative 2. Is this your first
visit to our restaurant—categorical 3. If not, how many times per month do you visit our restaurant—
quantitative 4. Would you recommend our restaurant to a friend—categorical 5. Do you think our dish
prices are expensive, about right, inexpensive—categorical 6. Rate the taste quality of food you ate
today—quantitative. For all quantitative variables numerical summaries would be meaningful, for
categorical variables, numerical summaries are NOT meaningful.
1.11 Answers will vary. 1. How many hours per week do you study—quantitative, hours 2. How many
nights per week do you study usually—quantitative, nights 3. Do you usually study alone or with
others—categorical 3. Do you feel like you study too much, about right, not enough—categorical.
1.12 Answers and reasons will vary. Examples include: current enrollment, average time to graduate,
graduation rate, job placement percentage, etc.
1.13 (a) The states are the cases. (b) The name of the state is the label variable. (c) Number of students
from the state who attend college—quantitative, number of students who attend college in their home
state—quantitative. (d) Answers will vary. This would tell you which states have large percentages of
students that like to stay “at home” versus small percentages, which indicate students’ preference to leave
home to attend college.
1.14 Each state could be divided as a percentage of the total of the nation’s fatalities to show state
differences; the disadvantage is that states with more population would have a higher number of fatalities.
Instead, each state’s fatalities could be divided by the state population to get a percentage for each state;
this would be a better way to compare state-to-state rates of drunk driving fatalities.
1.15 Answers may vary. The pie chart does a better job because it shows the dominance of Google as a
source, filling almost three-quarters of the pie.
1.16 Answers may vary. It is probably a good idea to round; most of the time we just need an idea of what
the data are telling us.
1.17 The Cost Centers would include, Parts and materials, Manufacturing equipment, Salaries,
Maintenance, and Office lease. We need to include Office lease even though it gives more than 80%,
because otherwise we would only have the top 75% according to the data. So, to get the other 5%, we
need to put Office lease in, giving us 82.12% total.

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DescriptionEdition: 4th Edition Format: Downloadable ZIP Fille Resource Type: Solution manual Duration: Unlimited downloads Delivery: Instant DownloadEdition: 6th Edition Format: Downloadable ZIP Fille Resource Type: Solution manual Duration: Unlimited downloads Delivery: Instant DownloadEdition: 2nd Edition Format: Downloadable ZIP Fille Resource Type: Solution manual Duration: Unlimited downloads Delivery: Instant DownloadEdition: 3rd Edition Format: Downloadable ZIP Fille Resource Type: Solution manual Duration: Unlimited downloads Delivery: Instant DownloadEdition: 3rd Edition Format: Downloadable ZIP Fille Resource Type: Solution manual Duration: Unlimited downloads Delivery: Instant DownloadEdition: 12th Edition Format: Downloadable ZIP Fille Resource Type: Solution manual Duration: Unlimited downloads Delivery: Instant Download
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Solution Manual for The Practice of Statistics for Business and Economics 4th Edition by Moore

Chapter 1: Examining Distributions Practice of Statistics for Business and Economics  1.1 The value of the coupon is computed by subtracting the DiscPrice from the RegPrice. It is quantitative because arithmetic operations, like the average value, would make sense. 1.2 The regular price for the Smokey Grill Ribs coupon is 20, the discount price is 11. 1.3 Who: The cases are coupons, there are 7 cases. What: There are 6 variables—ID, Type, Name, Item, RegPrice, and DiscPrice. Only RegPrice and DiscPrice have units in dollars. Why: The data might be used to compare coupons to one another to see which are better. We would not want to draw conclusions about other coupons not listed. 1.4 The cases are apartments. There are 5 variables: Monthly rent-quantitative, Fitness center-categorical, Pets allowed-categorical, # of Bedrooms-quantitative, Distance to campus-quantitative. 1.5 (a) If you were interested in attending a large college, you would want to know the number of graduates. (b) If you were interested in making sure you graduate, you would want to know the graduation rate. 1.6 (a) The cases are summer jobs. (b) Variables might include: position, company, hourly wage, whether the job is on or off campus, hours per week, other answers are possible. (c) position—categorical, company-categorical, hourly wage-quantitative, on or off campus-categorical, hours per weekquantitative, other answers are possible. (d) We could use a number as a label. The reason for doing so is there could be several jobs with the same company or position that you would need to differentiate from one another. (e) Who: part (a) answer, What: part (b) and (c), Why: To compile a list of available summer jobs and possibly compare them. We would not want to draw conclusions about other jobs not listed. 1.7 (a) The cases are employees. (b) Employee identification number—label, last name—label, first name—label, middle initial—label, department—categorical, number of years—quantitative, salary— quantitative, education—categorical, age—quantitative. (c) Sample data would vary. 1.8 Answers will vary. 1.9 (a) Quantitative. (b) Quantitative. (c) Quantitative. (d) Quantitative. (e) Categorical. (f) Categorical. For all quantitative variables, numerical summaries would be meaningful; for categorical variables, numerical summaries are NOT meaningful. 2 Chapter 1 Examining Distributions 1.10 Answers will vary. 1. Rate the customer service of the restaurant—quantitative 2. Is this your first visit to our restaurant—categorical 3. If not, how many times per month do you visit our restaurant— quantitative 4. Would you recommend our restaurant to a friend—categorical 5. Do you think our dish prices are expensive, about right, inexpensive—categorical 6. Rate the taste quality of food you ate today—quantitative. For all quantitative variables numerical summaries would be meaningful, for categorical variables, numerical summaries are NOT meaningful. 1.11 Answers will vary. 1. How many hours per week do you study—quantitative, hours 2. How many nights per week do you study usually—quantitative, nights 3. Do you usually study alone or with others—categorical 3. Do you feel like you study too much, about right, not enough—categorical. 1.12 Answers and reasons will vary. Examples include: current enrollment, average time to graduate, graduation rate, job placement percentage, etc. 1.13 (a) The states are the cases. (b) The name of the state is the label variable. (c) Number of students from the state who attend college—quantitative, number of students who attend college in their home state—quantitative. (d) Answers will vary. This would tell you which states have large percentages of students that like to stay “at home” versus small percentages, which indicate students’ preference to leave home to attend college. 1.14 Each state could be divided as a percentage of the total of the nation’s fatalities to show state differences; the disadvantage is that states with more population would have a higher number of fatalities. Instead, each state’s fatalities could be divided by the state population to get a percentage for each state; this would be a better way to compare state-to-state rates of drunk driving fatalities. 1.15 Answers may vary. The pie chart does a better job because it shows the dominance of Google as a source, filling almost three-quarters of the pie. 1.16 Answers may vary. It is probably a good idea to round; most of the time we just need an idea of what the data are telling us. 1.17 The Cost Centers would include, Parts and materials, Manufacturing equipment, Salaries, Maintenance, and Office lease. We need to include Office lease even though it gives more than 80%, because otherwise we would only have the top 75% according to the data. So, to get the other 5%, we need to put Office lease in, giving us 82.12% total.

Solution Manual for Modern Business Statistics with Microsoft Excel 6th Edition by Anderson

Solutions to Case Problems  Chapter 2 Descriptive Statistics: Tabular and Graphical Displays   Case Problem 1: Pelican Stores  
  1. There were 70 Promotional customers and 30 Regular customers. Percent frequency distributions for many of the variables are given.
 
No. of ItemsPercent Frequency
1   29
2  27
3  10
4  10
5    9
6    7
7 or more    8
Total:100
 
Net SalesPercent Frequency
0.00 - 24.999
25.00 - 49.9930
50.00 - 74.9925
75.00 - 99.9910
100.00 - 124.9912
125.00 - 149.994
150.00 - 174.993
175.00 - 199.993
200 or more    4
Total:100
 
Method of PaymentPercent Frequency
American Express    2
Discover    4
MasterCard  14
Proprietary Card  70
Visa  10
Total:100
   
GenderPercent Frequency
Female93
Male    7
Total:100
   
Martial StatusPercent Frequency
Married84
Single  16
Total:100
    These percent frequency distributions provide a profile of Pelican's customers. Many observations are possible, including:  
  • A large majority of the customers use National Clothing’s proprietary credit card.
  • The percent frequency distribution of net sales shows that 61% of the customers spent $50 or more.
  • Customers are distributed across all adult age groups.
  • The overwhelming majority of customers are female.
  • Most of the customers are married.
  • This is NOT the TEXT BOOK. You are buying Essentials of Modern Business Statistics with Microsoft Excel 6th Edition Solutions Manual by Anderson.
    • Solutions Manual comes in a PDF or Word format and available for download only.
    • Anderson Essentials of Modern Business Statistics with Microsoft Excel 6th Edition Solutions Manual only NO Test Bank included on this purchase. If you want the Test Bank please search on the search box.
    • All orders are placed anonymously. Your purchase details will be hidden according to our website privacy and be deleted automatically.Modern Business Statistics
 

Solution Manual for Business Statistics 2nd Edition by Jaggia

Chapter 1. Statistics and Data Solutions
    1. The population is all iPhone 4 users.
    2. Sample statistics
 
  1. The value 35 is the estimated average age of the population. It is both costly and time consuming (likely impossible) to take a census of all video game players and compute the actual average age.
 
    1. The population is all students enrolled in the accounting class.
    2. The value 3.29 represents the population parameter since we are not choosing a sample but drawing results from the actual population.
 
    1. The population is all marketing managers.
    2. No, the average salary is a sample statistic computed from a sample, not the population.
 
    1. The population is all elderly people. The sample consists of 949 elderly people.
    2. 22% and 17% represent the sample statistics.
   
DateAdj. Close Price
Dec 10$593.97
Nov 10$555.71
Oct 10$613.70
Sep  10$525.79
Aug 10$450.02
Jul   10$484.85
Jun  10$444.95
May 10$485.63
Apr  10$525.70
Mar 10$567.12
Feb  10$526.80
Jan  10$529.94
Source: Monthly Adj Close Price in 2010 from Retrieved April 19, 2011.   These numbers represent time series data. The adjusted close price of the stock was rather volatile, with a 12-month high in October and 12-month low in June.    
  1. Note: Individual answers will vary. This is an example of what an answer may look like.
AccommodationMonthly Expenses
Dorm$435
Dorm$480
Rental$505
Other$50
Rental$600
Dorm$425
Rental$525
Other$550
Other$325
Dorm$385
Rental$475
Dorm$400
Dorm$485
Rental$485
Other$475
Dorm$425
Rental$500
Dorm$375
Rental$625
Other$350
  This data is cross-sectional data because it can be assumed to be taken at the same point in time. The monthly lodging expenses ranges from a low of $50 to a high of $625. The average expense is $443.75.

Solution Manual for Essentials of Business Analytics 3rd Edition by Camm

CHAPTER 1 SM NOT EXISTENT Chapter 2
Descriptive Statistics   Case Problem:  Heavenly Chocolates Website Traffic  
  1. Descriptive statistics for the time spent on the website, number of pages viewed, and amount spent are shown below.
 
Time (min)Pages ViewedAmount Spent ($)
Mean12.84.868.13
Median11.44.562.15
Standard Deviation6.062.0432.34
Range28.68140.67
Minimum4.3217.84
Maximum32.910158.51
Sum640.52413406.41
  The mean time a shopper is on the Heavenly Chocolates website is 12.8 minutes, with a minimum time of 4.3 minutes and a maximum time of 32.9 minutes.  The following histogram demonstrates that the data are skewed to the right.   The meannumber of pages viewed during a visit is 4.8 pages with a minimun of 2 pages and a maximum of 10 pages A histogram of the number of pages viewed indicates that the data are slightly skewed to the right.       The mean amount spent for an on-line shopper is $68.13 with a minimum amount spent of $17.84 and a maximum amount spent of $158.51.  The following histogram indicates that the data are skewed to the right.    
  1. Summary by Day of Week
 
Day of WeekFrequencyTotal Amount Spent ($)Average Amount Spent ($)
Sunday5218.1543.63
Monday9813.3890.38
Tuesday7414.8659.27
Wednesday6341.8256.97
Thursday5294.0358.81
Friday11945.4385.95
Saturday7378.7454.11
Total503406.4168.13
  The above summary shows that Monday and Friday are the best days in terms of both the total amount spent and the averge amount spent per transaction. Friday had the most purchases (11) and the highest value for total amount spent ($945.43). Monday, with nine transactions, had the highest average amount spent per transaction ($90.38).  Sunday was the worst sales day of the week in terms of number of transactions (5), total amount spent ($218.15), and average amount spent per transaction ($43.63). However, the sample size for each day of the week are very small, with only Friday having more than ten transactions. We would suggest a larger sample size be taken before recommending any specific stratgegy based on the day of week statistics.  
  1. Summary by Type of Browser
 
BrowserFrequencyTotal Amount Spent ($)Average Amount Spent ($)
Firefox161228.2176.76
Chrome271656.8161.36
Other7521.3974.48
  Chrome was used by 27 of the 50 shoppers (54%).But, the average amount spent spent bycustomers who used Chrome ($61.36)is less than the average amount spent by customers who used Firefox ($76.76) or some other type of browser ($74.48). This result would suggest targeting special promotion offers to Firefox users or users of other types of browsers. But, before recommending  any specific strategies based upon the type of browser, we would suggest taking a larger smaple size.  
  1. A scatter diagram showing the relationship between time spent on the website and the amount spent follows:
 

Solution Manual for Business Statistics 9th Edition by Black

Catch up on homework in no time with this indispensable solution manual. It’s filled with answers to questions at the end of chapters, problems, case studies, and more directly from your textbook. Download NOW to get INSTANT access to this digital solution manual. Study the way that’s right for you on your phone, laptop, tablet, or any other digital device immediately. There’s no mailing or shipping. No waiting days or weeks to receive this priceless information. Buy and download immediately to get your homework done on time and to absolutely master key concepts for class discussions and exams. Our solutions manual has helped thousands of students answer questions flawlessly at the end of each chapter. It’s like having your own private instructor to help anywhere, anytime. It’s no wonder why students everywhere are crediting this solution manual for their homework improvement, better overall understanding, and boosted test scores. When you study alone, you might get the answers wrong and learn facts and concepts incorrectly. Often, students develop a gap in knowledge that can spread to homework and tests. This can cause lower grades, despite your hard work throughout the semester. Now you have the custom assistance you deserve. This solution manual was created by experts with thorough knowledge of every end-of-chapter question and its answers. Still now sure? Download our FREE Sample to get an inside look at the helpful information included in this solution manual. The sample is fully digital so you can view it immediately on your laptop, tablet, phone, or computer. This is the most convenient way to study—and it’s available right now. This solution manual * is great for finishing homework quickly. It’s ideal for busy students who need a proven, accurate way to correctly answer questions in the textbook. * provides additional resources so you can master the concepts presented in all chapters with ease. * is like having your own expert tutor close by to help you earn better grades and complete work faster. Buy and download NOW! Get busy studying and get your homework done, the correct and fast way.

Solution Manual for Business Research Methods 12th Edition by Cooper

Research refers to the outcome of human desire to investigate and deeper understanding of existing phenomena or find out the possibility of occurrence of a new phenomenon. Research is the starting point in any discipline. It is the key to the success and growth of any discipline.
Research refers to the process of defining the research problem and collecting, organizing, evaluating and interpretation of data and making a conclusion to solve the research problem. Therefore, business research refers to the process of identifying the opportunities and threats in the market and analyzing the strengths and weakness of the company to fulfill the requirements of the market and to compete. An example of business research is studying the buying behavior of North USA population who are below 30 years. Such a research will be helpful for a business to sell their goods/products effectively. Hence a business research is useful.
There should be any questions about the business research because the definition helps to guide the researcher on the path of his research and the purpose of his research. It is important because there are many definitions of research which guides or fulfill different purposes of research. A GEM of a Study Abstract: The Global Entrepreneurship Monitor Entrepreneurial Assessment, a joint project of The Kauffman Center for Entrepreneurial Leadership at Babson College (now Arthur M. Blank Center for Entrepreneurship) and The London Business School, has undertaken a long-term, large-scale project to prove the causal links between a government’s economic policies and initiatives, the resulting entrepreneurial activity and subsequent economic growth. This case describes multiple-stage research, including thousands of interviews in several countries by established research firms.  How/When to Use This case deals with the concept of causal studies vs. descriptive studies and what needs to be included in the research design of each study type. It also deals with what constitutes control in research design; in this context it is best used with chapters 5 and chapter 6 although it may be used with chapters 6-9. This is also a great case to use to discuss constructs vs. concepts (Chapter 3), as Exhibit C-GEM-1.1 clearly has struggled with defining numerous constructs and multiple-measurement variables and, therefore, could be used to further explore text Exhibit 3-1. The case also mentions the use of standardized data; in this context you could use the case to explore how “standardized” data from different countries really is and where the student seeks such country-specific data.
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